Blogging in School

Disclaimer: I’m not going to claim that this is a tell-all blog on the secrets of blogging while under serious time constraints. I don’t have all of the secrets, and of the ones that I do have, many are specific to my particular situation, my particular daily routine, my specific mindset… But I’m going to share what I have here, in hopes that some of it may help you out too.

I’m a full time undergraduate student at the University of Texas at Austin, taking 12-13 hours per semester, double majoring in mathematics and computer science, and working ~10 hours each week as a learning assistant for various math classes (This semester, it’s a probability class.). I love going to school, but the schoolwork in addition to the work work takes up a massive amount of time, probably 80-90 hours per week (All of my classes are upper division), and I place them as my top priority. In addition, for the first time in my life, I’m living in an apartment–with an utterly worthless roommate. This means that I have to make time for grocery shopping, cleaning, cooking, etc. regularly, which cuts heavily into my remaining leisure hours. On top of this, because I’m not satisfied with having even a single free waking moment, I am trying to walk 10k+ steps per day, maintain a vigorous reading schedule, and review and post actively on this blog.

Last semester, I didn’t do a very good job of it. I slacked off on the blog, on the cleaning, heck, on pretty much everything except school and work. And occasionally sleep. It kind of sucked, so part of my project over the break was to get things in order so that I could have a better semester. I’m also taking classes that, hopefully, have a lighter workload, so I won’t be quite as overwhelmed, but that’s not enough for me to stay on top of blogging. Here’s a few of the things I’m doing to stay ahead and be able to write regular blog posts, including this one. While this is written to help find blogging time, it may help with your schedule even if you’re not trying to fit in blogging.

The largest, most obvious piece of advice is to use every waking moment. I make myself do this by writing up a schedule every day, usually the night before, where I list out activities by the 30 minute or hour level, such as right now, 8-9, Bus to campus and work on writing this post. I have found that if I don’t pre-specify what I should be doing at a specific point in time, I’ll just sit around and do nothing, or pick something easy and ignore the stuff that really needs to be done. I will also overestimate the amount of time I’ll have later, and that leads to late nights and very little sleep.

I also have to get enough sleep. I’ve spent several semesters of college operating on a very limited sleep schedule, with perhaps 5 hours of sleep per night, and it just makes me miserable and unproductive. I have found that I’m much happier if I make myself stop what I’m working on and go to sleep earlier, even if it means more activities for the next day. I’ve also found that reading before bed helps with this, and if I can grab 30 minutes of something—recently, LotR—while I’m lying in bed trying to get to sleep, it makes it much easier to fall asleep, calming my mind after a crazy day. I actually find I *save* time by doing this; without the reading it often can take me that much longer to fall asleep, unless I’m completely exhausted.

Once I have enough sleep and a schedule, I also have to find the time in my schedule to write the blog posts. Sometimes, it seems as if schoolwork takes up every hour of the day, leaving no time for non-necessities. I have to consider two more things that make it possible for me to do this. The first is knowing how to schedule efficient study time.

I am a block worker on many, many projects. It will take me a while, perhaps half an hour to an hour, to get into the mindset of difficult subjects, like my advanced mathematics class, and I find that there are simply some subjects where I cannot get anything done in a half an hour or an hour long block. When that’s all the time I have, I have to schedule activities that fit. Things that are self-contained, and perhaps not incredibly taxing. For example, taking a short online quiz for a class, or finding and printing a news article to turn in, or doing a 5 page assigned reading. Or doing part of a blog post. I schedule the more challenging subjects for longer blocks of time, such as when I’m home in the afternoons or over the weekend. This is one of the things that took me the longest to figure out—I have to use my time chunks efficiently, even if that means putting off the most difficult and urgent tasks until I can give them my undivided attention. Your methods may differ from mine, but you have to figure out what they are in order to schedule your time most efficiently.

You also have to learn to multi-task. I’ve started doing this to a large degree this semester by adding a few activities to my chart. My blog posts are done almost exclusively on the bus, with the exception of giving myself half an hour to an hour after they’re written to edit and post them on my blog, something that requires internet access. When walking, I am also listening to audiobooks, which is an immense help with my reading schedule. (Thanks Jessie!) I have to make myself do cleaning while dinner is cooking every day, and usually I’m messaging people and setting up my schedule for the next day while eating dinner. I take books with me to the bathroom, and as already mentioned, reading right before bed does double duty of calming my mind before sleep. Look for the opportunities to always be both physically and mentally engaged. Perhaps the most extreme example I have seen of this was a classmate in my calculus class a few years ago. The professor handed out notes, so it was not necessary to be writing during class, so that the we could pay closer attention to the lectures. The student (whose name slips my mind at the moment) spent the entire class, every time, knitting, and by the end of the semester, she had several scarves and good grades to show for her efforts. It was pretty cool.

Perhaps the best blog-specific advice I can offer is to think and write an outline ahead of time. This post is one of the best resources I’ve ever found for improving my word-count when I have time to do fiction writing, but the advice applies equally well to blog posts. If you write posts that you’re excited about and you’ve outlined and you know what you’re doing ahead of time, the writing will go much, much faster. Take those two minutes in the middle of class when you’ve finished the quiz and you’re waiting for everyone else to make a rough sketch in your mind–or on paper–of what you’re going to write about on the bus ride home that day. It really does help.

Turn the internet off while writing. That one doesn’t need any explanation.

Never lose track of your long-term goals, and at the end of each day, think about them for a few moments. If you’ve done your day right, scheduled in all of the productivity you can, and done your best to stick to the schedule (It’s impossible to do it perfectly and get *everything* done that you want to. Try anyway.), allow yourself to feel proud and satisfied with yourself. I’ve found that when I’ve had a good day, and I sit and reflect on it, even for a few moments, it leaves me in a good mood for the next day, which helps to boost my productivity. It’s a happy feedback loop, and once you get it started, it’s addictive.

Also, take time to enjoy yourself during the day. Yes, I say to schedule every waking moment. And my current schedule looks something like this…

The schedule is a few weeks old, but it's a good representation of my regular schedule.
The schedule is a few weeks old, but it’s a good representation of my regular schedule.

But I have to give myself some moments to relax and enjoy what I’m doing or else I’ll go insane. Lately, these have been my walks, during which I listen to and enjoy audiobooks, but once I get caught up with my schoolwork (I had a bad weekend. Bad days happen, and the best thing you can do is try to make the next day better.), I’m planning to schedule in a little more relaxation time every day so I don’t go from 50% to 100% utterly insane. 😉

This post was more rambling and less-blog specific than I had hoped, but hopefully there’s a few nuggets in here that may help you with your life, even if it’s not as insane as mine. I know that adopting the things I’ve mentioned here has gotten me off to a much better, and more productive start this semester than any in the past, and I’m really hoping that if I can stick with it, the feedback loop will keep me going and I’ll have a good semester.

Also, please comment below, and let me know what your favorite time-saving or productivity hacks are, especially those that help with your blog posts. Or, if you take one of my tips and it works, let me know!

4 thoughts on “Blogging in School

  1. It might not be something you can do with school and fridge space, but I do all my meal prep and a lot of my cooking on one day each week. I save so much time just having to reheat things that are already cooked or having everything ready to go in the crockpot so it can cook while I’m at work.

    I also have each of my cleaning chores regulated to their own day each week so I don’t have to do it all in one day. It saves time when I only have to spend 20-30 minutes cleaning a day. But that might not be possible with your roommate situation.

    1. I’ve actually started doing that recently for dinners–cooking a big pot of soup or stew, then reheating each night as needed. It’s been great: hot, quick, *and* filling. Unfortunately, I can’t really extend that to other meals, as I tend to eat cereal at breakfast and pack lunches to eat during class, but it’s definitely a great idea to do it when you can!

      Yeah… I pretty much clean when I have to. Can never tell what’s going to be utterly trashed and need sanitizing when I get home on a given evening. It’s a good suggestion, though, and I hope I can make something similar work this fall–perhaps even trading off days with my new, improved roommate.

  2. Bryan L.

    I think your point about relaxing and having some time to yourself is very important. For me personally, I like to cook so I try to experiment and learn how to cook new dishes. One thing that’s helped me with things like dishes is that I’m never standing still. Waiting for a pot of water to start boiling? It’s a great time to do some dishes so the overall workload isn’t disheartening at the end.

    Awesome blog, looking forward to more!

    1. Heh, yeah. I’m already 70% insane, if I didn’t take the time to decompress, I’d probably tip the 75% mark and they’d throw me in a mental hospital somewhere.

      I really wish I was better at cooking, but unfortunately with my current apartment situation (amount of time spent on campus, plus roommate making messes every day.), I don’t really have the time to get into it as much as I would like. I’m hoping that’ll change in the fall, though.

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