ARC Review: The Dinosaur Lords

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A world made by the Eight Creators on which to play out their games of passion and power, Paradise is a sprawling, diverse, often brutal place. Men and women live on Paradise as do dogs, cats, ferrets, goats, and horses. But dinosaurs predominate: wildlife, monsters, beasts of burden – and of war. Colossal planteaters like Brachiosaurus; terrifying meateaters like Allosaurus and the most feared of all, Tyrannosaurus rex. Giant lizards swim warm seas. Birds (some with teeth) share the sky with flying reptiles that range in size from batsized insectivores to majestic and deadly Dragons.

Thus we are plunged into Victor Milán’s splendidly weird world of The Dinosaur Lords, a place that for all purposes mirrors 14th century Europe with its dynastic rivalries, religious wars, and byzantine politics…and the weapons of choice are dinosaurs. Where we have vast armies of dinosaur-mounted knights engaged in battle. And during the course of one of these epic battles, the enigmatic mercenary Dinosaur Lord Karyl Bogomirsky is defeated through betrayal and left for dead. He wakes, naked, wounded, partially amnesiac – and hunted. And embarks upon a journey that will shake his world.

Disclaimer: I received an advance copy of this book from a friend. This has in no way affected my review. Dinosaurs.

Dinosaurs on a Richard Anderson cover with a GRRM cover-quote. I feel like reviewing this book is going to be completely redundant.

I first want to note that I have been anticipating this book so highly, and worked so hard to find myself an advance copy to read, because of that cover and its art. I’ve actually done this with a fair number of Tor books, including some without Richard Anderson cover art, and despite the old adage, I do sometimes judge a book by its cover. Cover art is important, and Irene Gallo did a brilliant job commissioning the art on this one. I’m nearly as excited about seeing the art for its sequel (Yes, there will be a sequel!) as I am for the book itself. To everyone who contributes to making these books look so awesome, thank you. And now, back to talking about this book specifically.

Dinosaurs.

The premise is, obviously, what made me pick this book up in the first place. I saw Jurassic Park when I was a kid. I had my dinosaur phase. I’m still having it, if I’m honest. Two little dinosaur figures live on my desk at work, and I went to see Jurassic World right after it came out. I fondly remember the Dinotopia days, and so I’ve been wanting more novels with dinosaurs. Dragons are all fine and good, as are other mythological or otherwise invented beasts, but, perhaps because they were once real, nothing can quite compete with the dinosaurs. Even if this book had had a lousy plot and been otherwise miserable, I would have read it all for the dinosaurs.

Dinosaurs.

They’re used quite heavily, too. Figuratively and literally. Milán realizes what a gold-mine he’s sitting on here, and he mines it deeply. He has done an incredible amount of world-building around the dinosaurs, right down to the chapter epigraphs that list the various species and explain their uses and quirks. They pervade the society of the novel, and they’re utterly brilliant. The terremoto (You’ll know what I mean when you read it) is a great example of this.

Dinosaurs.

The rest of the world-building is great as well, and I mean that literally. I really want a map to help me understand exactly what’s going on (The ARC didn’t have one. I’m looking forward to getting my finished hardcover with the maps.). It feels like we simultaneously are, and are not, on a different version of Earth’s Europe. The Spanish influence is incredibly strong here, and it shows in the dual names that many places—and species of dinosaurs—have. One of my favorite examples of this is montañazul, a portmanteau of montaña and azul, which is called in English Blue Mountain.

Dinosaurs.

The plot takes a while to get going, and the first section of the book can be quite confusing. I urge you to stick with it. Once the second section starts, things begin to make a lot more sense, and we quickly settle down into following just a few viewpoints in a nice, linear fashion. While the plot still gets bogged down with the worldbuilding at times, it has a good sense of forward drive and it makes for an engaging book.

Dinosaurs.

Other than the occasional drag of the plot, my biggest complaint is the rape scene. (Warning: There’s a rape scene.) It felt largely unnecessary to the plot. Thankfully, Milán appears, at least for now, to be handling the aftermath much better than some other books I’ve read, and I have hopes that he’ll continue to do so in the next book.

Dinosaurs.

And yes, there will be a next book. If I recall correctly, Milán has said that The Dinosaur Lords is the first in a trilogy, which is the first of a pair of trilogies, and we definitely get glimpses of much larger plots beginning to move in the background of the world. They’re only teased at, however, and you can safely push them to the side and focus on the awesome in the rest of the book, though you may want to pay them more attention if you’re reading this at a later date and lucky enough to be able to pick up The Dinosaur Knights immediately after finishing, as I have a feeling it’ll have a lot more of the large-scale plot in the foreground.

Dinosaurs.

Milán did a great job with the diversity of the world, too, not only with the many species of dinosaurs and their abilities, but also with the characters themselves. They come from all walks of life, various nationalities and races, and he does a great job of representing non-straight characters of various types throughout, including casting them into important roles. I’ve come to start expecting at least a minimum of diversity from the novels I read, and the book soared well clear of that bar.

Dinosaurs.

In summary, nobody had sex with a dinosaur. It was the worst dinosaur erotica I’ve ever read. But, if you’re looking for something a little different, while The Dinosaur Lords felt like a mess at the very beginning, once the plot settles down, it is a great dinosaur adventure novel. The diversity of both characters and dinosaurs was awesome, and the eponymous dinosaurs pervade every page of this amazing novel, which lives up to most of the hype of the cover. Four out of Five stars, and I’m eagerly awaiting the next novel in the series.

Dinosaurs.

Victor Milán.

Amazon.

Goodreads.

2 thoughts on “ARC Review: The Dinosaur Lords

  1. Pingback: Book Review: The Dinosaur Knights – Mental Megalodon

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