ARC Review: The Bone Witch

Disclaimer: I received a copy of this novel from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my thoughts, feelings, or anything of that nature regarding it. You have been advised.

The Bone Witch

From Goodreads:

Tea is different from the other witches in her family. Her gift for necromancy makes her a bone witch, who are feared and ostracized in the kingdom. For theirs is a powerful, elemental magic that can reach beyond the boundaries of the living—and of the human.

Great power comes at a price, forcing Tea to leave her homeland to train under the guidance of an older, wiser bone witch. There, Tea puts all of her energy into becoming an asha, learning to control her elemental magic and those beasts who will submit by no other force. And Tea must be strong—stronger than she even believes possible. Because war is brewing in the eight kingdoms, war that will threaten the sovereignty of her homeland…and threaten the very survival of those she loves.

The cover of this book captivated me and was the original reason I chose to request the novel. It is beautifully dark, with purple hues and the skull right in the center, like a warning to anyone entering. Unfortunately, though the contents inside do oftentimes match the atmosphere given off by the cover, I found myself bored throughout the middle of the book. While there are parts that certainly make reading the middle worth it for the end, much of it felt easily skipped. The descriptions of daily life, while good in moderation, seem like the majority of the novel and cause it to drag. I wanted more action, more daeva fighting, but these were much smaller sections of the book than I had thought would be the case. The comparison to Memoirs of a Geisha is warranted with the descriptions of becoming an asha, but it is not nearly as captivating as Golden’s work.

In addition, the characters did not feel as well fleshed out as I would have liked. Many of them feel one-dimensional, or had character traits described but not shown nearly as much in their actions. While Tea was definitely rebellious and strong-willed, I had a hard time connecting to her even though she is the narrator of her own story. Oftentimes, she felt almost bland to me, even though she has the coolest magical skill set and could raise people from the dead. I had an easier time connecting to her protective, yet stoic older brother. And her love interests? Flat throughout the majority of the novel.

However, the strength of The Bone Witch falls in its worldbuilding. I loved the descriptions of the heartsglass, the drawing of the runes for the magic system, and the demonic daeva. While the countries fall on real-world examples to help flesh them out, they still feel alive from the information we are given about them and seeing their people populate the novel. There are even old myths and an age-old conflict that help make this world feel vibrant. I especially enjoyed how most of the countries did not have much in the way of Western influences, and how the asha are like fighting geisha. Even the description of the food veers away from fantasy norms. Chupeco does a wonderful job at making her world, while familiar in many ways, feel atypical in a Western fantasy dominated market.

Due to the middle of the novel’s slowness and the flat characters, even though the worldbuilding was strong I give The Bone Witch three out of five stars. While it does end on a cliffhanger of sorts, because I did not connect with Tea as much as I would have liked, I will not likely be reading the next book in the series. With characterization being so important to me, I wish she had as much life to her as the world around her does.

Richard Anderson: An Appreciation

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Badass covers, right? Everyone’s heard the saying “Don’t judge a book by its cover.” It holds true a lot of the time. I’ve seen books with amazing covers that sucked, and I’ve seen the reverse even more often. (Take the first paperback cover for Mistborn as an example.) Regardless, however, I admire beautiful cover art, and I will still occasionally pick up a book just because it looks amazing. Right now, that means I’ll try anything with a Richard Anderson cover. So far, he has not lead me wrong. But even if he somehow does, I will likely keep picking up the covers and hoping that I can, some day, get posters of some of his art. What makes me say that? Well, let’s look at a few more of his covers.

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What I really like about Anderson’s art is that he not only paints awesome pictures, but he also matches them evocatively with the book’s material. He draws the characters from the book, and they are often in situations that occur during the book—situations which are instantly recognizable and memorable. The exception to this is, I think, the TEB cover above which represents the three main characters and the feel of the novel so perfectly that the fact that the scene never occurs in the book is more than excusable.

His covers aren’t for every book, of course. I can’t see his cover on something like The Last Unicorn, for example. It has to be the right pairing of artist and subject matter. I feel that he is usually perfectly matched for the covers I’ve seen. In addition to the above badassery (I mean, blood magic portals to alternate evil doppleganger universes…[Mirror Empire] Come on. That oozes awesome.), he painted the first cover that made me immediately go out and preorder the book based on the title and the cover alone, without knowing anything else. I’ve since obtained a copy of this book through mostly legitimate methods, and I really enjoyed it. Here’s the cover.

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I’ll pause for a moment before I conclude so that you can go order that one. Go on, I’ll be here when you get back.

I’m going to end this post with one more picture, one of the latest covers revealed in Richard Anderson’s ever-growing collection of amazing art, which is the cover to what is perhaps my most anticipated book of next year behind the only the next Stormlight book (When will Sanderson get a Richard Anderson cover? I would buy the heck out of that.). Badass birds, awesome red-heads, dual-wielding axes, a lovely dark color scheme with a hint of red, this is just so amazing.

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