Book Review: Daughter of Smoke and Bone

Daughter of Smoke and Bone

From Goodreads:

Around the world, black hand prints are appearing on doorways, scorched there by winged strangers who have crept through a slit in the sky.

In a dark and dusty shop, a devil’s supply of human teeth grows dangerously low.

And in the tangled lanes of Prague, a young art student is about to be caught up in a brutal otherworldly war.

Meet Karou. She fills her sketchbooks with monsters that may or may not be real, she’s prone to disappearing on mysterious “errands”, she speaks many languages – not all of them human – and her bright blue hair actually grows out of her head that color. Who is she? That is the question that haunts her, and she’s about to find out.

When beautiful, haunted Akiva fixes fiery eyes on her in an alley in Marrakesh, the result is blood and starlight, secrets unveiled, and a star-crossed love whose roots drink deep of a violent past. But will Karou live to regret learning the truth about herself?

I have a strange relationship with young adult novels. I really liked Magonia when a lot of other people didn’t, for example. In this particular case, I did not like Daughter of Smoke and Bone quite as much as the Goodreads consensus does. I really, truly was hoping to love it, as it was our book club pick this month. Star-crossed lovers, you say? I enjoyed that trope in These Broken Stars. Angels and demons are fun, too. But other than the world building, it just didn’t click with me in the way other books have. Perhaps it was because the main character’s personality seemed typical for the genre? Maybe it was the instant love between Akiva and Karou. Maybe it was the predictable plot. In any case, I just did not fall in love with Taylor’s story.

Let me start with what I did enjoy. This story was not what I expected it to be from the blurb on the back. The angels and demons are not what they first seem, and I quite liked that! I loved the descriptions of the various chimaera, of their different aspects, of their cultural myths and legends. While war between a slave race and a dominant race is nothing new, Taylor does manage to create an interesting conflict that will be quite the driving force in the later novels, I can only assume. Additionally, the use of teeth for wishes was grotesque and super cool at the same time, as is what the teeth are actually used for within the story.

However, as for the characters, I enjoyed the secondary characters over the main cast. Zuzana, Brimstone, Issa, even Razgut… I felt that they were all so much more more realistic than Akiva and Karou are. Karou reminded me of that comic describing young adult main characters being good at everything and a vampire to boot. (Of course, she isn’t a vampire, but I digress.) She’s talented at drawing, combat, has chimaera for a family… She’s as special as it gets. While it didn’t make me dislike her, it still felt too unbelievable even given the explanation. I think it may be because I prefer to see that growth during the course of the novel, rather than being given a character that’s already good at everything. Her only downsides seemed to be that she felt empty and acted as expected for her age, and I suppose that would be what teens would relate to and is, of course, understandable. Even so, I feel like more flaws or weaknesses would make her feel more “human”.

As for the romance… It was instant and frustrating, and the part that really made me want to put this novel down. While I thought it was definitely cute at times, there needed to be more development, even with the excuse given later on as to why they are so drawn to each other. There was just too much, too fast to begin to be believable, especially with the circumstances in which they first meet in the story. The romance fires sparks within a day, and I find that rather ridiculous. Instant lust, sure. That would make sense. Since it is termed as love in the story, however, I can’t help but shake my head.

With all of the above, as well as a jarring story structure (see: last fourth of the book switching gears dramatically), I can’t give this novel more than three stars. While I am curious to read the other two books in the series because of how the book ends, I am hesitant. I don’t really ship the romance as hard as I would like to, and the story really just isn’t gripping me the way it should to read it all. In one word, it was unbelievable. And that’s a weird word to use for a fantasy novel.

Book Review: Magonia

magonia-maria-dahvana-headley

From Goodreads:

Aza Ray is drowning in thin air.

Since she was a baby, Aza has suffered from a mysterious lung disease that makes it ever harder for her to breathe, to speak—to live.

So when Aza catches a glimpse of a ship in the sky, her family chalks it up to a cruel side effect of her medication. But Aza doesn’t think this is a hallucination. She can hear someone on the ship calling her name.

Only her best friend, Jason, listens. Jason, who’s always been there. Jason, for whom she might have more-than-friendly feelings. But before Aza can consider that thrilling idea, something goes terribly wrong. Aza is lost to our world—and found, by another. Magonia.

Above the clouds, in a land of trading ships, Aza is not the weak and dying thing she was. In Magonia, she can breathe for the first time. Better, she has immense power—and as she navigates her new life, she discovers that war is coming. Magonia and Earth are on the cusp of a reckoning. And in Aza’s hands lies the fate of the whole of humanity—including the boy who loves her. Where do her loyalties lie?

I honestly was not sure if I would like this book in the beginning. It begins with stream of consciousness writing, with a slice of life focus. While fascinating and beautifully written in its own right, I could not help but feel that Aza Ray was a special snowflake. Nerdier than the rest of the class? Check. Only one friend who understands her, and is just as nerdy? Check. Nerdiness is almost to the point of being beyond belief? Check. A mysterious illness that not even doctors understand? Needless to say, I had a hard time initially with the novel. However, as I continued reading, these facets added to the fantastic and dream-like atmosphere of the story. While we see a typical YA heroine with special powers and coming to terms with her destiny, the world building and mythos make up for these tropes and others throughout the story.

Maybe I have not read enough, but I have never read something quite like this novel. Ships in the sky? Sure, I’ve seen that plenty of times. Birds that roost in your lungs to amplify your singing voice, however? That as well as plenty of other facets, from the Magonian race to the Rostrae, were unique and refreshing. I fell in love with this world, even if there were plot holes abound and a lack of believable characters.

Even if they were unbelievable, however, I still could not help but empathize with them all. They all had clear goals, clear motivations, and were never black and white. It was also nice to see Aza and Jason’s parents play such a strong role in the story as well. I could not help but root for everyone, cry with them, and laugh with them, especially with how strong the audiobook performance was. Even once I had to turn in the audiobook and read the physical book, their voices stayed with me.

Although there was a romance triangle, it made sense within the context of the novel and did not bother me as much as they normally tend to do. Jason and Aza together, in particular, were adorable, and I could not get enough of them. From the alligator costume in their beginning years to watching giant squid together, the entire time I wanted to both hug them and push them together at every moment.

Factoring in the improbable characters and plot holes (seriously, Jason, using the dark web as an excuse for all the shenanigans you manage to get up to??), I give this novel four out of five stars for wonderful world building, emotional and poetic writing, and for making me cry on the bus home of all places. I will definitely be giving the second book a try, as Aza Ray’s story will stick with me for a long time.  Thank you, Maria Dahvana Headley, for writing such a poignant and amazing novel.